Is “The Lovely Bones” based on a true story? Yes, but there is much more to it…

0
1188
lovely bones true story

Lovely bones true story – The Lovely Bones, directed by Peter Jackson, is a PG-13 film that is perhaps one of the scariest films ever filmed. Saoirse Ronan plays Susie Salmon, an ordinary young girl brutally killed by her creepy neighbor on her way home from school in this 2009 film (Stanley Tucci). Susie can keep an eye on her loved ones somewhere between Heaven and Earth as they seek justice for her murder. 

Paranormal suspense would be the correct genre label for The Lovely Bones, but horror is more appropriate. It lacks the ghosts and jumps scares that are staples of the horror genre, yet the tension is just as high. And the effect is long-lasting. The Lovely Bones introduced many people to the genre of “horror.” Unfortunately, they were traumatized by it, and now that the Halloween season has here, they’re giving it another watch, only to discover that it’s as scary as they remembered. But how come? Why does reading lovely bones true story give you the chills?

Actual events served as the inspiration for the plot.

Natural occurrences inspired author Alice Seybold’s 2002 novel lovely bones true story. The novel describes in explicit detail Susie’s murder and rape at the hands of Mr. Harvey. Sebold describes her experience as a rape victim in her book Lucky, published in 1999. She was, like Susie, on her way home (to her college dorm) when she was attacked. She was a freshman in college at the time, and she was 18 years old.

The author also said the rape and murder of a young Norristown, Pennsylvania girl in the 1970s inspired the story. Sebold intended to create a narrative from the deceased girl’s point of view after her parents kidnaped her.

 Frightening as it may be, lovely bones’ true story depicts the tale of every woman’s greatest dread and, for some, the reality. For female viewers, the danger is amplified because they may see themselves in Susie, who is relatable since she is average but still quite intelligent. Anything that happened to her might happen to any of us. And what could be more terrifying than the truth?

The Criminal Is a Normal Joe

Similar to how Susie is just a regular girl, Mr. Harvey is just a regular guy, which makes the reality that he’s a serial murderer all the more unnerving. Mr. Harvey might easily be your next-door neighbor. He wears knit pullovers, eats cookies, and sets traps to kill young women. His crimes aren’t as severe as Michael Myers’ or Ghost Face’s, but they’re nonetheless nasty. He is the very definition of the chills, and he probably scared off more than a few neighbors for a time.

Mr. Harvey seems like the kind of guy who always goes out of his way to help others. He’s a kind guy who helps out the cops and is “kind” to the youngsters in his area. Unlike Mr. Dwyer, the guy Susie acknowledges as a serial murderer, this individual is not a prime candidate. Let’s pretend (for the sake of argument) that Mr. 

Harvey doesn’t appear like a serial murderer (he does, of course, but that’s a given). For this reason, Susie decides to put her confidence in him. The controlled psychopathic side of Mr. Harvey and the wild horrific side. Mr. Harvey, who planned and prepared (traps, alibis, and lies), and Mr. Harvey, who ruins things and people, appear in some of the film’s most unsettling sequences. When you put them together, you get a hazardous person.

Read More- The Best Movies About Camping 

An Overwhelming Feeling of Dread Prevails

There is an overwhelming air of dread throughout the lovely bones true story, as though danger is always around the corner. The irony is that after a second viewing, the audience realizes this is the case, at least in one particular scenario. As Susie and her grandma (Susan Sarandon) go to the mall, she is so preoccupied with her infatuation (Reece Ritchie) that she doesn’t see Mr. Harvey following them. One may easily miss him as he walks by the storefront window, but later on, he seems to be observing from a distance.

Something more sinister occurs in Mr. Harvey’s lair. When he’s telling Susie she needs to remain, the camera focuses on a bobblehead toy she’s anxiously searching for. It’s nodding its head “Yes,” as if it were replying to her, as though her destiny were sealed or the cosmos were playing a terrible joke on her.

The spectra of death haunt the film, and Mr. Harvey is there in every scene. The tension builds almost intolerable, particularly in the scene where Susie’s sister Lindsey (Rose McIver) sneaks into Mr. Harvey’s home and comes dangerously close to being his next victim. Feelings of dread are never positive, but they indicate a well-crafted horror story.

There is an overwhelming air of dread throughout The Lovely Bones, as though danger is always around the corner. The irony is that after a second viewing, the audience realizes this is the case, at least in one particular scenario. As Susie and her grandma (Susan Sarandon) go to the mall, she is so preoccupied with her infatuation (Reece Ritchie) that she doesn’t see Mr. Harvey following them. One may easily miss him as he walks by the storefront window, but later on, he seems to be observing from a distance.

Something more sinister occurs in Mr. Harvey’s lair. When he’s telling Susie she needs to remain, the camera focuses on a bobblehead toy she’s anxiously searching for. It’s nodding its head “Yes,” as if it were replying to her, as though her destiny were sealed or the cosmos were playing a terrible joke on her.

The spectra of death haunt the film, and Mr. Harvey is there in every scene. Susie’s sister Lindsey (Rose McIver) enters Mr. Harvey’s home and comes dangerously close to being his next victim, raising the stakes to nearly intolerable levels. A compelling horror story should leave the audience with dread, which is not a pleasant emotion.

Read More- The Background Story Of Euphoria Bathroom Guy

It’s Open-Ended

Maybe the terrifying aspect of The Lovely Bones is what is left unseen. Susie’s murder is one of several plot points left open. Once Mr. Harvey locks the latch on the hideaway, the audience is left to speculate what becomes to Susie within; however, they are given some hints by the use of suggestive imagery.

Susie, for one, sees Mr. Harvey bathing in a sterile white chamber somewhere in the in-between. Mud and blood have caked the tiled floor, and a knife rests on the sink nearby. There is no mistaking the message here: Susie put up a fight, and her death was gruesome and violent.

Mr. Harvey removes the flannel covering his face and squeezes out the dirty water. Susie cries out as the camera focuses on his hands twisting the cloth. Who knows? Maybe she had her throat slit. Not only does he touch her in the novel, but it’s quite probable he did so in real life. 

His caressing her bracelet’s charms before he throws it into the river is a strong hint in that direction, but it’s not the only one. Susie, who has been learning about Mr. Harvey’s past victims, says this chilling thing to Flora Hernandez (Stefania LaVie Owen) after the film “His main interest was in physically interacting with her. Instead, she let forth a bloodcurdling scream.” So while viewers are spared graphic violence, they are nonetheless unnerved by what they see.

FAQs

Is the killer from lovely bones real?

Douglas examined a real-life case that was very similar to the fictitious “Beautiful Bones” murder.

Did they ever find lovely bones body?

The above-listed portion explains everything you should know about lovely bones’ true story

Read More- What is the We are Marshall True Story?